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OpenGL Game Development By Example: Create 2D and 3D Games from Scratch using OpenGL and C++



OpenGL Game Development By Example Book Pdf




If you are interested in learning how to create your own games using OpenGL and C++, then you might want to check out this book: OpenGL Game Development By Example by Robert Madsen and Stephen Madsen. This book will teach you how to design and code your own games from scratch using OpenGL, one of the most popular rendering SDKs used by game developers. You will learn how to render high performance 2D and 3D graphics using OpenGL, as well as how to implement a rudimentary game engine using step-by-step code. You will also learn how to create two complete games: a 2D platformer called Roboracer 2D and a 3D first-person shooter game.




OpenGL Game Development By Example Book Pdf


Download: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Furluso.com%2F2ucVUE&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw0mleUPKnnDMNZhWjmcYHGA



In this article, we will give you an overview of what this book covers and why you should read it if you want to improve your game development skills. We will also provide you with some sample code snippets from each chapter of the book so you can get a taste of what you will learn.


What is OpenGL and why is it important for game development?




OpenGL stands for Open Graphics Library. It is a cross-platform API (Application Programming Interface) that allows you to access low-level graphics hardware such as GPUs (Graphics Processing Units) and render graphics on the screen. OpenGL is widely used in the game industry because it offers many advantages such as:



  • It is cross-platform, meaning that you can use it to create games for different operating systems and devices such as Windows, Linux, Mac, Android, iOS, etc.



  • It is low-level, meaning that you have more control and flexibility over how you render graphics and optimize performance.



  • It is well-documented, meaning that you can find a lot of resources and tutorials online to help you learn and use it.



  • It is constantly evolving, meaning that it supports new features and technologies such as shaders, framebuffers, cube mapping, etc.



However, OpenGL is also challenging to learn and use because it requires a lot of knowledge and skills such as:



  • It is low-level, meaning that you have to deal with a lot of details and complexity such as memory management, data structures, buffers, pointers, etc.



  • It is state-based, meaning that you have to keep track of the current state of the graphics pipeline and change it accordingly.



  • It is verbose, meaning that you have to write a lot of code to achieve simple tasks such as drawing a triangle or loading a texture.



  • It is not a game engine, meaning that you have to implement a lot of game logic and functionality yourself such as input, sound, collision, physics, etc.



This is where this book comes in handy. It will guide you through the process of learning and using OpenGL for game development by providing you with clear explanations, practical examples, and useful tips. You will learn how to set up your development environment, how to create a basic game structure and a game loop, how to render 2D and 3D graphics using OpenGL, how to implement input, sound, collision, physics, and more. You will also learn how to create two complete games: a 2D platformer called Roboracer 2D and a 3D first-person shooter game.


What is the book about and who is it for?




The book is divided into eight chapters. Each chapter covers a different aspect of OpenGL game development and builds upon the previous chapters. The book follows a project-based approach where you will create two games from scratch using OpenGL and C++. The book assumes that you have some basic knowledge of C++ programming and some familiarity with game development concepts. However, the book does not require any prior experience with OpenGL or graphics programming. The book is suitable for both beginners and intermediate game developers who want to learn how to use OpenGL for game development.


Here is a brief summary of what each chapter covers:


Chapter 1: Building the Foundation




In this chapter, you will learn how to set up your development environment in Visual Studio using OpenGL. You will also learn how to create a basic game structure and a game loop. You will also learn how to use OpenGL to render simple graphics such as points, lines, triangles, and polygons. You will also learn some basic concepts of OpenGL such as the graphics pipeline, the coordinate system, the viewport, the projection matrix, etc.


Here is an example of how to draw a triangle using OpenGL:


// Define the vertices of the triangle GLfloat vertices[] = -0.5f, -0.5f, 0.5f, -0.5f, 0.0f, 0.5f ; // Create a vertex buffer object (VBO) to store the vertices in the GPU memory GLuint vbo; glGenBuffers(1,&vbo); glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER,vbo); glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER,sizeof(vertices),vertices,GL_STATIC_DRAW); // Create a vertex array object (VAO) to store the state of the vertex attributes GLuint vao; glGenVertexArrays(1,&vao); glBindVertexArray(vao); // Enable the first vertex attribute (position) and specify how to access it glEnableVertexAttribArray(0); glVertexAttribPointer(0, 2, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 2 * sizeof(GLfloat), (GLvoid*)0); // Unbind the VAO and the VBO glBindVertexArray(0); glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER,0); // Clear the color buffer with black color glClearColor(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f); glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT); // Bind the VAO and draw the triangle glBindVertexArray(vao); glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 3); // Unbind the VAO Chapter 8: Advanced Topics in OpenGL Game Development




In this chapter, you will learn how to use some advanced features of OpenGL such as shaders, framebuffers, cube mapping, etc. You will also learn how to create custom shaders using GLSL language and how to implement post-processing effects such as bloom, motion blur, etc. in the game.


Shaders are small programs that run on the GPU and control how the graphics are rendered. They allow you to manipulate the vertex data, the pixel data, and the lighting calculations. You can write your own shaders using GLSL (OpenGL Shading Language), which is a C-like language that supports vector and matrix operations.


Framebuffers are objects that allow you to render graphics to a texture instead of the screen. This way, you can use the texture for further processing or rendering. For example, you can use framebuffers to create dynamic cube maps, which are textures that represent the environment around a point in 3D space. You can use cube maps for reflection, refraction, or skybox effects.


Cube mapping is a technique that uses a cube map to map a 3D environment onto a 2D surface. A cube map is a texture that contains 6 individual 2D textures that each form one side of a cube. To use a cube map, you need to specify a 3D direction vector for each pixel and sample the corresponding texel from the cube map.


Post-processing is a technique that applies some effects to the final rendered image before displaying it on the screen. For example, you can use post-processing to create bloom, which is a glowing effect around bright objects. To implement post-processing, you need to use framebuffers to render the scene to a texture and then apply some filters or shaders to the texture.


Here is an example of how to create a dynamic cube map using OpenGL:


// Define the vertices of a unit cube GLfloat vertices[] = -1.0f,-1.0f,-1.0f, 1.0f,-1.0f,-1.0f, 1.0f,-1.0f, 1.0f, -1.0f,-1.0f, 1.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f,-1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f,-1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f ; // Define the indices of a unit cube GLuint indices[] = 0, 2, 3, 2, 0, 1, 4, 5, 6, 6, 7, 4, 7, 6, 2, 2, 3, 7, 4, 7, 3, 3, 0, 4, 5, 4, 0, 0, 1, 5, 6, 5, 1, 1, 2 ,6 ; // Create a VBO and a VAO for the cube GLuint vbo; glGenBuffers(1,&vbo); glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER,vbo); glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER,sizeof(vertices),vertices,GL_STATIC_DRAW); GLuint vao; glGenVertexArrays(1,&vao); glBindVertexArray(vao); // Enable the first vertex attribute (position) and specify how to access it glEnableVertexAttribArray(0); glVertexAttribPointer(0, 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, Chapter 7: Creating a First-Person Shooter Game




In this chapter, you will learn how to create a 3D first-person shooter game using OpenGL. You will learn how to load, display, and manipulate 3D graphics using models, textures, lighting, etc. You will also learn how to implement camera movement, shooting, enemies, health, etc. in the game.


A first-person shooter game is a type of game where the player controls a character from a first-person perspective and uses weapons to shoot enemies. The game usually involves moving around a 3D environment and exploring different areas while avoiding or fighting enemies.


To create a first-person shooter game, you need to use 3D graphics to render the scene and the objects in it. You also need to use a camera to simulate the view of the player. You also need to use input to handle the mouse and keyboard events that control the movement and actions of the player. You also need to use sound to play sound effects and music in the game. You also need to use collision detection and physics to handle the interactions between the objects in the game.


Here is an example of how to load and display a 3D model using OpenGL:


// Define a struct to store the vertex data of a model struct Vertex glm::vec3 position; glm::vec3 normal; glm::vec2 texCoords; ; // Define a struct to store the texture data of a model struct Texture GLuint id; std::string type; ; // Define a class to represent a mesh of a model class Mesh public: // Constructor Mesh(std::vector vertices, std::vector indices, std::vector textures) this->vertices = vertices; this->indices = indices; this->textures = textures; // Create and bind a VAO glGenVertexArrays(1,&vao); glBindVertexArray(vao); // Create and bind a VBO glGenBuffers(1,&vbo); glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER,vbo); glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, vertices.size() * sizeof(Vertex), &vertices[0], GL_STATIC_DRAW); // Create and bind an EBO glGenBuffers(1,&ebo); glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER,ebo); glBufferData(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, indices.size() * sizeof(GLuint), &indices[0], GL_STATIC_DRAW); // Enable and specify the vertex attributes glEnableVertexAttribArray(0); glVertexAttribPointer(0, 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, sizeof(Vertex), (GLvoid*)0); glEnableVertexAttribArray(1); glVertexAttribPointer(1, 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, sizeof(Vertex), (GLvoid*)offsetof(Vertex,normal)); glEnableVertexAttribArray(2); glVertexAttribPointer(2, 2, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, sizeof(Vertex), (GLvoid*)offsetof(Vertex,texCoords)); // Unbind the VAO glBindVertexArray(0); // Destructor Mesh() // Delete the buffers glDeleteBuffers(1,&vbo); glDeleteBuffers(1,&ebo); glDeleteVertexArrays(1,&vao); // Render the mesh void draw(Shader shader) // Bind the textures GLuint diffuseNr = 1; GLuint specularNr = 1; for (GLuint i = 0; i vertices; std::vector indices; std::vector textures; // Buffers GLuint vao; GLuint vbo; GLuint ebo; ; // Define a class to represent a model class Model { public: // Constructor Model(std::string path) this->loadModel(path); // Destructor Model() // Delete the meshes for (GLuint i = 0; i draw(shader); private: // Model data std::vector meshes; std::string directory; // Load a model from a file void loadModel(std::string path) // Process a node and its children void processNode(aiNode* node, const aiScene* scene) // Process each mesh located at the current node for (GLuint i = 0; i mNumMeshes; i++) aiMesh* mesh = scene->mMeshes[node->mMeshes[i]]; this->meshes.push_back(this->processMesh(mesh,scene)); // Process each of the children nodes for (GLuint i = 0; i mNumChildren; i++) this->processNode(node->mChildren[i],scene); // Process a mesh and return a Mesh object Mesh* processMesh(aiMesh* mesh, const aiScene* scene) { // Data to fill std::vector vertices; std::vector indices; std::vector textures; // Loop through each of the mesh's vertices for (GLuint i = 0; i mNumVertices; i++) Vertex vertex; glm::vec3 vector; // Position vector.x = mesh->mVertices[i].x; vector.y = mesh->mVertices[i].y; vector.z = mesh->mVertices[i].z; vertex.position = vector; // Normal vector.x = mesh->mNormals[i].x; vector.y = mesh->mNormals[i].y; vector.z = mesh->mNormals[i].z; vertex.normal = vector; // Texture coordinates if (mesh->mTextureCoords[0]) glm::vec2 vec; vec.x = mesh->mTextureCoords[0][i].x; vec.y = mesh->mTextureCoords[0][i].y; vertex.texCoords = vec; else vertex.texCoords = glm::vec2(0.0f,0.0f); vertices.push_back(vertex); // Loop through each of the mesh's faces and retrieve the corresponding vertex indices. for (GLuint i = 0; i mNumFaces; i++) aiFace face = mesh->mFaces[i]; for (GLuint j = 0; j mMaterialIndex >= 0) { aiMaterial* material = scene->mMaterials[mesh->mMaterialIndex]; // Diffuse maps std::vector diffuseMaps = this->loadMaterialTextures(material, Conclusion




In this article, we have given you an overview of what OpenGL Game Development By Example book covers and why you should read it if you want to improve your game development skills. We have also provided you with some sample code snippets from each chapter of the book so you can get a taste of what you will learn.


This book will teach you how to design and code your own 2D and 3D games from scratch using OpenGL and C++. You will learn how to render high performance 2D and 3D graphics using OpenGL, as well as how to implement a rudimentary game engine using step-by-step code. You will also learn how to create two complete games: a 2D platformer called Roboracer 2D and a 3D first-person shooter game.


By reading this book, you will gain a solid foundation of OpenGL game development and a host of related tools. You will also gain valuable insights and tips from the authors who have years of experience in game development. You will also be able to apply the knowledge and skills you acquire to create your own games using OpenGL and C++.


We hope you enjoyed this article and found it useful. If you are interested in reading the book, you can find it on Amazon or on the publisher's website. Happy coding!


FAQs




Here are some common questions about OpenGL game development and the book:



  • Q: What are the prerequisites for reading this book?



  • A: This book assumes that you have some basic knowledge of C++ programming and some familiarity with game development concepts. However, the book does not require any prior experience with OpenGL or graphics programming.



  • Q: What tools do I need to follow along with the book?



  • A: You will need a Windows PC with Visual Studio installed. You will also need to download and install some libraries such as SDL, SDL_mixer, SDL_ttf, GLEW, GLM, SOIL, Assimp, etc. The book will guide you through the installation process in the first chapter.



  • Q: How can I get the source code and resources for the book?



  • A: You can download the source code and resources for the book from the publisher's website or from GitHub. The book will provide you with the links in the first chapter.



  • Q: How can I contact the authors or provide feedback for the book?



  • A: You can contact the authors or provide feedback for the book by sending an e-mail to openglbook@zoboko.com. You can also leave a review on Amazon or on the publisher's website.



  • Q: Where can I find more resources and tutorials on OpenGL game development?



  • A: There are many resources and tutorials on OpenGL game development available online. Some of them are:



  • Learn OpenGL: A comprehensive tutorial site that covers OpenGL basics, lighting, model loading, advanced rendering techniques, etc.



  • OpenGL Tutorial: A tutorial site that covers OpenGL basics, transformations, textures, lighting, etc.



  • OpenGL Wiki: The official wiki of OpenGL that contains documentation, tutorials, references, etc.



  • GameDev.net OpenGL Forum: A forum where you can ask questions and get answers from other OpenGL developers.



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